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Free Exam: Unit Test

Number of Questions in Test: 24
Number of Questions in Preview: 5
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Question 1

Reading Passage I
When I was young, there were two places in the neighborhood where children could play: in a back yard and in an empty lot.
Most of my friends considered back yards boring. They were too safe and familiar. Yet it was there that we enjoyed the simple games of dodge ball and tag. In the bushes that bordered our yards, we had endless chances to observe birds and insects. In one yard we pitched a tent every summer. We would hide out in it and read comic books while eating peanut-butter sandwiches. Another back yard had an immense brick barbecue beside a neat patio with tables and chairs. You could roast a whole cow in that barbecue. Usually, we just roasted hot dogs.
Yes, back yards were safe. When we wanted adventure, however, a back yard could not compare to an empty lot. There were three empty lots on our block, one on the east side of the street and two on the west side. Among the rows of houses, they stood out like missing teeth. If course the lots were not really empty. Every inch was covered with prickly weeds. We had a strategy for trampling down the weeds to make a hiding place. First we pulled up our socks to protect our legs. Then, very carefully, we would walk in a circle, around and around, until we had tramped down the space.
The lots contained a great amount of trash, too, that drivers and playful winds had flung there: candy wrappers, potato-chip bags, soda cans-you name it. In other words, the lots were great places for finding stuff. We seldom found objects of value, but we did not mind that. It was the hunt that mattered. We needed only to find something unexpected, however small, to experience the glory of discovery.
Ah, yes. When I was young, back yards were safe, and a child could get lost in an empty lot.

1.Which place do you think the author's parents would prefer? (7-1.1)

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: No

Question 2

Reading Passage I
When I was young, there were two places in the neighborhood where children could play: in a back yard and in an empty lot.
Most of my friends considered back yards boring. They were too safe and familiar. Yet it was there that we enjoyed the simple games of dodge ball and tag. In the bushes that bordered our yards, we had endless chances to observe birds and insects. In one yard we pitched a tent every summer. We would hide out in it and read comic books while eating peanut-butter sandwiches. Another back yard had an immense brick barbecue beside a neat patio with tables and chairs. You could roast a whole cow in that barbecue. Usually, we just roasted hot dogs.
Yes, back yards were safe. When we wanted adventure, however, a back yard could not compare to an empty lot. There were three empty lots on our block, one on the east side of the street and two on the west side. Among the rows of houses, they stood out like missing teeth. If course the lots were not really empty. Every inch was covered with prickly weeds. We had a strategy for trampling down the weeds to make a hiding place. First we pulled up our socks to protect our legs. Then, very carefully, we would walk in a circle, around and around, until we had tramped down the space.
The lots contained a great amount of trash, too, that drivers and playful winds had flung there: candy wrappers, potato-chip bags, soda cans-you name it. In other words, the lots were great places for finding stuff. We seldom found objects of value, but we did not mind that. It was the hunt that mattered. We needed only to find something unexpected, however small, to experience the glory of discovery.
Ah, yes. When I was young, back yards were safe, and a child could get lost in an empty lot.

2.Which best describes the point of view of the author? (7-1.2)

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: No

Question 3

Reading Passage I
When I was young, there were two places in the neighborhood where children could play: in a back yard and in an empty lot.
Most of my friends considered back yards boring. They were too safe and familiar. Yet it was there that we enjoyed the simple games of dodge ball and tag. In the bushes that bordered our yards, we had endless chances to observe birds and insects. In one yard we pitched a tent every summer. We would hide out in it and read comic books while eating peanut-butter sandwiches. Another back yard had an immense brick barbecue beside a neat patio with tables and chairs. You could roast a whole cow in that barbecue. Usually, we just roasted hot dogs.
Yes, back yards were safe. When we wanted adventure, however, a back yard could not compare to an empty lot. There were three empty lots on our block, one on the east side of the street and two on the west side. Among the rows of houses, they stood out like missing teeth. If course the lots were not really empty. Every inch was covered with prickly weeds. We had a strategy for trampling down the weeds to make a hiding place. First we pulled up our socks to protect our legs. Then, very carefully, we would walk in a circle, around and around, until we had tramped down the space.
The lots contained a great amount of trash, too, that drivers and playful winds had flung there: candy wrappers, potato-chip bags, soda cans-you name it. In other words, the lots were great places for finding stuff. We seldom found objects of value, but we did not mind that. It was the hunt that mattered. We needed only to find something unexpected, however small, to experience the glory of discovery.
Ah, yes. When I was young, back yards were safe, and a child could get lost in an empty lot.

3."Among the rows of houses, they stood out like missing teeth" is an example of what figurative language? (7-1.4)

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: No

Question 4

Reading Passage I
When I was young, there were two places in the neighborhood where children could play: in a back yard and in an empty lot.
Most of my friends considered back yards boring. They were too safe and familiar. Yet it was there that we enjoyed the simple games of dodge ball and tag. In the bushes that bordered our yards, we had endless chances to observe birds and insects. In one yard we pitched a tent every summer. We would hide out in it and read comic books while eating peanut-butter sandwiches. Another back yard had an immense brick barbecue beside a neat patio with tables and chairs. You could roast a whole cow in that barbecue. Usually, we just roasted hot dogs.
Yes, back yards were safe. When we wanted adventure, however, a back yard could not compare to an empty lot. There were three empty lots on our block, one on the east side of the street and two on the west side. Among the rows of houses, they stood out like missing teeth. If course the lots were not really empty. Every inch was covered with prickly weeds. We had a strategy for trampling down the weeds to make a hiding place. First we pulled up our socks to protect our legs. Then, very carefully, we would walk in a circle, around and around, until we had tramped down the space.
The lots contained a great amount of trash, too, that drivers and playful winds had flung there: candy wrappers, potato-chip bags, soda cans-you name it. In other words, the lots were great places for finding stuff. We seldom found objects of value, but we did not mind that. It was the hunt that mattered. We needed only to find something unexpected, however small, to experience the glory of discovery.
Ah, yes. When I was young, back yards were safe, and a child could get lost in an empty lot.

4. What did the empty lots symbolize to the author? (7-1.5)

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: No

Question 5

Reading Passage II
The little house on Tampa Street in New Orleans was as neat as a postcard. That is how Lila Jackson Brown liked it, and that is how she kept it. The only thing she loved more than her house was her son, Kevin.
Kevin spent his early childhood with his mother, but when he turned fourteen, he went to live with his father in San Francisco. His mother approved of the move because she believed that a teenage boy needed his father's guidance.
Kevin's father, Thomas Brown, was a skilled carpenter. Building contractors all over the city admired his work and gave him plenty of jobs. Thomas hoped that his son would become a carpenter, too. Kevin, however, wanted a career in communications technology. That, Kevin argued, was where the big money was.
"Work is a complex undertaking," Thomas told him. "Making money is only one part of job satisfaction. When you are an adult, you will understand that."
Shortly after Kevin graduated from high school, his mother became ill. Kevin postponed tech school and returned to New Orleans. His father went with him.
When they arrived, they noticed how the little house had changed. "The place is rundown," Kevin remarked. "Apparently, Mom has been too sick to keep it up."
"We can fix it," his father said, "if you are willing."
Kevin was willing. While his father rebuilt the back porch, Kevin refinished cupboards, sanded floors, and repaired windows. By the time his mother was feeling better, the house looked precisely as it had before he went away.
"So what do you think?" Thomas asked his son.
Kevin looked at the house. It had been a hard job, harder than he had ever imagined it would be. Yet, incredibly, he had enjoyed the work and had never felt more satisfaction.
"I think," Kevin answered, "that I'm now an adult."

5. Why did Kevin move to California to be with his father? (7-1.1)

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: No

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