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Free Exam: 2nd 9 Weeks Test Review

Number of Questions in Test: 45
Number of Questions in Preview: 5
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Question 1

[i]DIRECTIONS: Read the passage. Then read each question about the passage. Decide which the best answer to each question is and circle those answers.[/i]

[b]The Quiet Girl[/b]

1 Jennifer paused in mid-sentence, pulling her pen from the paper. She could hear the new student, Anjouli, shifting in the seat behind her. Anjouli must be having trouble with her essay. Jennifer speculated, because she is still learning English. Jennifer knew she shouldn't turn around, or she might get them both in trouble. Mrs. Sabotowitz was pacing slowly up and down the room, making sure no one was copying anyone else's work. She always acted like she expected the worst of everyone, Jennifer thought. She went back to her essay. The topic she chose was more challenging than usual, but she felt confident that she would get another A.

2 Jennifer heard Anjouli heave an anxious sigh, Jennifer was about to turn over her paper and set down her pen to show that she had finished, when suddenly, she did something unpremeditated. Slowly, casually, she leaned to one side and gazed vaguely out the window. If Anjouli was able to read what Jennifer had written, it might help her. That wouldn't exactly be cheating. Jennifer reasoned, would it?

3 What would it feel like to be Anjouli? Jennifer mused, her imagination filling in the blanks. Maybe Anjouli's parents put pressure on her to get good grades. She never spoke up in class, so along with not being fluent in English, she must also be shy. Anjouli was the only student from Pakistan in the entire school, so she must also feel left out. Jennifer had heard another girl at lunch whispering that her parents would not let them make friends with someone like Anjouli because she probably had different beliefs. When Jennifer shared this with her mother, she was appalled. "Then you should be her friend," her mother said. "No one deserves to be stereotyped!"

4 Suddenly, Mrs. Sabotowitz was saying something. "Did you hear me, Jennifer?" she asked. Her voice was angry.

5 "What?" Jennifer asked, blushing. Mrs. Sabotowitz's glaring eyes drilled a hole in Jennifer's skull.

6 "I said, I'll take your paper. Yours too, Anjouli. I want to see you both after class."

7 Twenty minutes later, Jennifer and Anjouli were standing in front of Mrs. Sabotowitz's desk. She regarded one, then the other, with suspicion.

8 "Jennifer, were you trying to help another student cheat? I saw you place your essay just where Anjouli could read it."

9 Jennifer was speechless. What could she say? She'd meant well, but that didn't sound like a good excuse. She was about to stammer something when Anjouli interjected. "Please don't give Jennifer a bad grade. She only wanted to help me." Then Anjouli added, "She didn't know that I didn't need it."

10 Mrs. Sabotowitz frowned and delivered a swift rebuttal. Later, however, she found that the girls had written on different topics. Jennifer's work was not her best. Anjouli's on the other hand was exceptional.


[b]1. This story is told from the point of view of - [/b]

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: Yes

Question 2

[i]DIRECTIONS: Read the passage. Then read each question about the passage. Decide which the best answer to each question is and circle those answers.[/i]

[b]The Quiet Girl[/b]

1 Jennifer paused in mid-sentence, pulling her pen from the paper. She could hear the new student, Anjouli, shifting in the seat behind her. Anjouli must be having trouble with her essay. Jennifer speculated, because she is still learning English. Jennifer knew she shouldn't turn around, or she might get them both in trouble. Mrs. Sabotowitz was pacing slowly up and down the room, making sure no one was copying anyone else's work. She always acted like she expected the worst of everyone, Jennifer thought. She went back to her essay. The topic she chose was more challenging than usual, but she felt confident that she would get another A.

2 Jennifer heard Anjouli heave an anxious sigh, Jennifer was about to turn over her paper and set down her pen to show that she had finished, when suddenly, she did something unpremeditated. Slowly, casually, she leaned to one side and gazed vaguely out the window. If Anjouli was able to read what Jennifer had written, it might help her. That wouldn't exactly be cheating. Jennifer reasoned, would it?

3 What would it feel like to be Anjouli? Jennifer mused, her imagination filling in the blanks. Maybe Anjouli's parents put pressure on her to get good grades. She never spoke up in class, so along with not being fluent in English, she must also be shy. Anjouli was the only student from Pakistan in the entire school, so she must also feel left out. Jennifer had heard another girl at lunch whispering that her parents would not let them make friends with someone like Anjouli because she probably had different beliefs. When Jennifer shared this with her mother, she was appalled. "Then you should be her friend," her mother said. "No one deserves to be stereotyped!"

4 Suddenly, Mrs. Sabotowitz was saying something. "Did you hear me, Jennifer?" she asked. Her voice was angry.

5 "What?" Jennifer asked, blushing. Mrs. Sabotowitz's glaring eyes drilled a hole in Jennifer's skull.

6 "I said, I'll take your paper. Yours too, Anjouli. I want to see you both after class."

7 Twenty minutes later, Jennifer and Anjouli were standing in front of Mrs. Sabotowitz's desk. She regarded one, then the other, with suspicion.

8 "Jennifer, were you trying to help another student cheat? I saw you place your essay just where Anjouli could read it."

9 Jennifer was speechless. What could she say? She'd meant well, but that didn't sound like a good excuse. She was about to stammer something when Anjouli interjected. "Please don't give Jennifer a bad grade. She only wanted to help me." Then Anjouli added, "She didn't know that I didn't need it."

10 Mrs. Sabotowitz frowned and delivered a swift rebuttal. Later, however, she found that the girls had written on different topics. Jennifer's work was not her best. Anjouli's on the other hand was exceptional.

[b]2. What is the initiating event of the story?[/b]

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: Yes

Question 3

[i]DIRECTIONS: Read the passage. Then read each question about the passage. Decide which the best answer to each question is and circle those answers.[/i]

[b]The Quiet Girl[/b]

1 Jennifer paused in mid-sentence, pulling her pen from the paper. She could hear the new student, Anjouli, shifting in the seat behind her. Anjouli must be having trouble with her essay. Jennifer speculated, because she is still learning English. Jennifer knew she shouldn't turn around, or she might get them both in trouble. Mrs. Sabotowitz was pacing slowly up and down the room, making sure no one was copying anyone else's work. She always acted like she expected the worst of everyone, Jennifer thought. She went back to her essay. The topic she chose was more challenging than usual, but she felt confident that she would get another A.

2 Jennifer heard Anjouli heave an anxious sigh, Jennifer was about to turn over her paper and set down her pen to show that she had finished, when suddenly, she did something unpremeditated. Slowly, casually, she leaned to one side and gazed vaguely out the window. If Anjouli was able to read what Jennifer had written, it might help her. That wouldn't exactly be cheating. Jennifer reasoned, would it?

3 What would it feel like to be Anjouli? Jennifer mused, her imagination filling in the blanks. Maybe Anjouli's parents put pressure on her to get good grades. She never spoke up in class, so along with not being fluent in English, she must also be shy. Anjouli was the only student from Pakistan in the entire school, so she must also feel left out. Jennifer had heard another girl at lunch whispering that her parents would not let them make friends with someone like Anjouli because she probably had different beliefs. When Jennifer shared this with her mother, she was appalled. "Then you should be her friend," her mother said. "No one deserves to be stereotyped!"

4 Suddenly, Mrs. Sabotowitz was saying something. "Did you hear me, Jennifer?" she asked. Her voice was angry.

5 "What?" Jennifer asked, blushing. Mrs. Sabotowitz's glaring eyes drilled a hole in Jennifer's skull.

6 "I said, I'll take your paper. Yours too, Anjouli. I want to see you both after class."

7 Twenty minutes later, Jennifer and Anjouli were standing in front of Mrs. Sabotowitz's desk. She regarded one, then the other, with suspicion.

8 "Jennifer, were you trying to help another student cheat? I saw you place your essay just where Anjouli could read it."

9 Jennifer was speechless. What could she say? She'd meant well, but that didn't sound like a good excuse. She was about to stammer something when Anjouli interjected. "Please don't give Jennifer a bad grade. She only wanted to help me." Then Anjouli added, "She didn't know that I didn't need it."

10 Mrs. Sabotowitz frowned and delivered a swift rebuttal. Later, however, she found that the girls had written on different topics. Jennifer's work was not her best. Anjouli's on the other hand was exceptional.

[b]3. Which statement expresses the main idea of paragraph 3?[/b]

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: Yes

Question 4

[i]DIRECTIONS: Read the passage. Then read each question about the passage. Decide which the best answer to each question is and circle those answers.[/i]

[b]The Quiet Girl[/b]

1 Jennifer paused in mid-sentence, pulling her pen from the paper. She could hear the new student, Anjouli, shifting in the seat behind her. Anjouli must be having trouble with her essay. Jennifer speculated, because she is still learning English. Jennifer knew she shouldn't turn around, or she might get them both in trouble. Mrs. Sabotowitz was pacing slowly up and down the room, making sure no one was copying anyone else's work. She always acted like she expected the worst of everyone, Jennifer thought. She went back to her essay. The topic she chose was more challenging than usual, but she felt confident that she would get another A.

2 Jennifer heard Anjouli heave an anxious sigh, Jennifer was about to turn over her paper and set down her pen to show that she had finished, when suddenly, she did something unpremeditated. Slowly, casually, she leaned to one side and gazed vaguely out the window. If Anjouli was able to read what Jennifer had written, it might help her. That wouldn't exactly be cheating. Jennifer reasoned, would it?

3 What would it feel like to be Anjouli? Jennifer mused, her imagination filling in the blanks. Maybe Anjouli's parents put pressure on her to get good grades. She never spoke up in class, so along with not being fluent in English, she must also be shy. Anjouli was the only student from Pakistan in the entire school, so she must also feel left out. Jennifer had heard another girl at lunch whispering that her parents would not let them make friends with someone like Anjouli because she probably had different beliefs. When Jennifer shared this with her mother, she was appalled. "Then you should be her friend," her mother said. "No one deserves to be stereotyped!"

4 Suddenly, Mrs. Sabotowitz was saying something. "Did you hear me, Jennifer?" she asked. Her voice was angry.

5 "What?" Jennifer asked, blushing. Mrs. Sabotowitz's glaring eyes drilled a hole in Jennifer's skull.

6 "I said, I'll take your paper. Yours too, Anjouli. I want to see you both after class."

7 Twenty minutes later, Jennifer and Anjouli were standing in front of Mrs. Sabotowitz's desk. She regarded one, then the other, with suspicion.

8 "Jennifer, were you trying to help another student cheat? I saw you place your essay just where Anjouli could read it."

9 Jennifer was speechless. What could she say? She'd meant well, but that didn't sound like a good excuse. She was about to stammer something when Anjouli interjected. "Please don't give Jennifer a bad grade. She only wanted to help me." Then Anjouli added, "She didn't know that I didn't need it."

10 Mrs. Sabotowitz frowned and delivered a swift rebuttal. Later, however, she found that the girls had written on different topics. Jennifer's work was not her best. Anjouli's on the other hand was exceptional.

[b]4. In the first paragraph, the story says that Jennifer's teacher "always acted like she expected the worst of everyone." Whose opinion is this?[/b]

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: Yes

Question 5

[i]DIRECTIONS: Read the passage. Then read each question about the passage. Decide which the best answer to each question is and circle those answers.[/i]

[b]The Quiet Girl[/b]

1 Jennifer paused in mid-sentence, pulling her pen from the paper. She could hear the new student, Anjouli, shifting in the seat behind her. Anjouli must be having trouble with her essay. Jennifer speculated, because she is still learning English. Jennifer knew she shouldn't turn around, or she might get them both in trouble. Mrs. Sabotowitz was pacing slowly up and down the room, making sure no one was copying anyone else's work. She always acted like she expected the worst of everyone, Jennifer thought. She went back to her essay. The topic she chose was more challenging than usual, but she felt confident that she would get another A.

2 Jennifer heard Anjouli heave an anxious sigh, Jennifer was about to turn over her paper and set down her pen to show that she had finished, when suddenly, she did something unpremeditated. Slowly, casually, she leaned to one side and gazed vaguely out the window. If Anjouli was able to read what Jennifer had written, it might help her. That wouldn't exactly be cheating. Jennifer reasoned, would it?

3 What would it feel like to be Anjouli? Jennifer mused, her imagination filling in the blanks. Maybe Anjouli's parents put pressure on her to get good grades. She never spoke up in class, so along with not being fluent in English, she must also be shy. Anjouli was the only student from Pakistan in the entire school, so she must also feel left out. Jennifer had heard another girl at lunch whispering that her parents would not let them make friends with someone like Anjouli because she probably had different beliefs. When Jennifer shared this with her mother, she was appalled. "Then you should be her friend," her mother said. "No one deserves to be stereotyped!"

4 Suddenly, Mrs. Sabotowitz was saying something. "Did you hear me, Jennifer?" she asked. Her voice was angry.

5 "What?" Jennifer asked, blushing. Mrs. Sabotowitz's glaring eyes drilled a hole in Jennifer's skull.

6 "I said, I'll take your paper. Yours too, Anjouli. I want to see you both after class."

7 Twenty minutes later, Jennifer and Anjouli were standing in front of Mrs. Sabotowitz's desk. She regarded one, then the other, with suspicion.

8 "Jennifer, were you trying to help another student cheat? I saw you place your essay just where Anjouli could read it."

9 Jennifer was speechless. What could she say? She'd meant well, but that didn't sound like a good excuse. She was about to stammer something when Anjouli interjected. "Please don't give Jennifer a bad grade. She only wanted to help me." Then Anjouli added, "She didn't know that I didn't need it."

10 Mrs. Sabotowitz frowned and delivered a swift rebuttal. Later, however, she found that the girls had written on different topics. Jennifer's work was not her best. Anjouli's on the other hand was exceptional.

[b]5. What is the main conflict in the story?[/b]

Type: Multiple choice
Points: 1
Randomize answers: Yes

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